Aleister Crowley
Quotations


I can imagine myself on my death-bed, spent utterly with lust to touch the next world, like a boy asking for his first kiss from a woman.

There is only one really safe, mild, harmless beverage and you can drink as much of that as you like without running the slightest risk, and what you say when you want it is, “Garcon! Un Pernod!”

Religion itself becomes offensively monotonous. On every point of vantage are pagodas -- stupid stalagmites of stagnant piety.

Destiny is an absolutely definite and inexorable ruler. Physical ability and moral determination count for nothing. It is impossible to perform the simplest act when the gods say “no.” I have no idea how they bring pressure to bear on such occasions; I only know that it is irresistible.

I was not content to believe in a personal devil and serve him, in the ordinary sense of the word. I wanted to get hold of him personally and become his chief of staff.

The pious pretence that evil does not exist only makes it vague, enormous and menacing.

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law.

Science is always discovering odd scraps of magical wisdom and making a tremendous fuss about its cleverness.

The conscience of the world is so guilty that it always assumes that people who investigate heresies must be heretics; just as if a doctor who studies leprosy must be a leper. Indeed, it is only recently that science has been allowed to study anything without reproach.

To the eyes of a god, mankind must appear as a species of bacteria which multiply and become progressively virulent whenever they find themselves in a congenial culture, and whose activity diminishes until they disappear completely as soon as proper measures are taken to sterilise them.

Intolerance is evidence of impotence.

Falsehood is invariably the child of fear in one form or another.

The joy of life consists in the exercise of one’s energies, continual growth, constant change, the enjoyment of every new experience. To stop means simply to die. The eternal mistake of mankind is to set up an attainable ideal.

The people who have really made history are the martyrs.

Ordinary morality is only for ordinary people.

Modern morality and manners suppress all natural instincts, keep people ignorant of the facts of nature and make them fighting drunk on bogey tales.

The ordinary man looking at a mountain is like an illiterate person confronted with a Greek manuscript.

The supreme satisfaction is to be able to despise one’s neighbour and this fact goes far to account for religious intolerance. It is evidently consoling to reflect that the people next door are headed for hell.



MemorableQuotations.com

Memorable Quotations: Edwardian Writers

Memorable Quotations: Edwardian Writers (Kindle Book)

Memorable Quotations: Elizabethan Writers

Memorable Quotations:
English Writers (A - B)

Memorable Quotations:
English Writers (C - F)

Memorable Quotations:
English Writers (G - K)

Memorable Quotations:
English Writers (L - O)

Memorable Quotations:
English Writers (P - Z)

Memorable Quotations: English Writers of the Past
(Kindle Book and Paperback)

Memorable Quotations: English Essayists

Memorable Quotations: English Novelists

Memorable Quotations: English Philosophers

Memorable Quotations: English Playwrights

Memorable Quotations: English Poets

Memorable Quotations: English Romantic Poets
(Kindle Book)

Memorable Quotations: British Women Writers

Memorable Quotations:
British Women Writers of the Past (Kindle Book)

Memorable Quotations: Victorian Writers

Memorable Quotations: Victorian Writers (Kindle Book)

Memorable Quotations: Restoration Dramatists

MemorableQuotations.com
http://www.memorablequotations.com