Joseph Addison
Quotations


The utmost extent of manís knowledge, is to know that he knows nothing.

If we may believe our logicians, man is distinguished from all other creatures by the faculty of laughter. He has a heart capable of mirth, and naturally disposed to it.

Husband a lie, and trump it up in some extraordinary emergency.

Nothing is capable of being well set to music that is not nonsense.

The unjustifiable severity of a parent is loaded with this aggravation, that those whom he injures are always in his sight.

The important question is not, what will yield to man a few scattered pleasures, but what will render his life happy on the whole amount.

Of all the diversions of life, there is none so proper to fill up its empty spaces as the reading of useful and entertaining authors.

Our disputants put me in mind of the scuttlefish that, when he is unable to extricate himself, blackens the water about him till he becomes invisible.

Authors have established it as a kind of rule, that a man ought to be dull sometimes; as the most severe reader makes allowances for many rests and nodding-places in a voluminous writer.

What sculpture is to a block of marble, education is to a human soul.

Friendships, in general, are suddenly contracted; and therefore it is no wonder they are easily dissolved.

The utmost extent of man's knowledge, is to know that he knows nothing.

Sunday clears away the rust of the whole week.

Suspicion is not less an enemy to virtue than to happiness; he that is already corrupt is naturally suspicious, and he that becomes suspicious will quickly be corrupt.

Admiration is a very short-lived passion that immediately decays upon growing familiar with its object, unless it be still fed with fresh discoveries, and kept alive by a new perpetual succession of miracles rising up to its view.

To a man of pleasure every moment appears to be lost, which partakes not of the vivacity of amusement.

Animals, in their generation, are wiser than the sons of men; but their wisdom is confined to a few particulars, and lies in a very narrow compass.

The most violent appetites in all creatures are lust and hunger; the first is a perpetual call upon them to propagate their kind, the latter to preserve themselves.

No oppression is so heavy or lasting as that which is inflicted by the perversion and exorbitance of legal authority.

With regard to donations always expect the most from prudent people, who keep their own accounts.

There is not any present moment that is unconnected with some future one. The life of every man is a continued chain of incidents, each link of which hangs upon the former. The transition from cause to effect, from event to event, is often carried on by secret steps, which our foresight cannot divine, and our sagacity is unable to trace. Evil may at some future period bring forth good; and good may bring forth evil, both equally unexpected.

There is not so variable a thing in nature as a ladyís head-dress.

Authors have established it as a kind of rule, that a man ought to be dull sometimes; as the most severe reader makes allowances for many rests and nodding-places in a voluminous writer.

That he delights in the misery of others no man will confess, and yet what other motive can make a father cruel?

Friendships, in general, are suddenly contracted; and therefore it is no wonder they are easily dissolved.

The greatest sweetener of human life is Friendship. To raise this to the highest pitch of enjoyment, is a secret which but few discover.

To a man of pleasure every moment appears to be lost, which partakes not of the vivacity of movement.

Mirth is like a flash of lightning, that breaks through a gloom of clouds, and glitters for a moment; cheerfulness keeps up a kind of daylight in the mind, and fills it with a steady and perpetual serenity.

Young men soon give, and soon forget, affronts; / Old age is slow in both.


MemorableQuotations.com

Memorable Quotations: Joseph Addison
(Kindle Book)

Memorable Quotations: Edwardian Writers

Memorable Quotations: Edwardian Writers (Kindle Book)

Memorable Quotations: Elizabethan Writers

Memorable Quotations:
English Writers (A - B)

Memorable Quotations:
English Writers (C - F)

Memorable Quotations:
English Writers (G - K)

Memorable Quotations:
English Writers (L - O)

Memorable Quotations:
English Writers (P - Z)

Memorable Quotations: English Writers of the Past
(Kindle Book and Paperback)

Memorable Quotations: English Essayists

Memorable Quotations: English Novelists

Memorable Quotations: English Philosophers

Memorable Quotations: English Playwrights

Memorable Quotations: English Poets

Memorable Quotations: English Romantic Poets
(Kindle Book)

Memorable Quotations: Essayists

Memorable Quotations:
Essayists of the Past (Kindle Book)

Memorable Quotations: Victorian Writers

Memorable Quotations: Victorian Writers (Kindle Book)

Memorable Quotations: Restoration Dramatists

MemorableQuotations.com
http://www.memorablequotations.com