Books by Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Abraham Lincoln

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Abraham Lincoln
(Kindle Book at Amazon)


Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) was the 16th president of the United States from 1861 to 1865. Born in a log cabin in the backwoods of Kentucky, Lincoln was practically exclusively self-educated. In 1831 he moved to New Salem, Illinois, and labored as a storekeeper, surveyor, and postmaster while learning the law. In 1834 he was elected to the state legislature, and in 1836 he became an attorney. He served one term from 1847 to 1849 in Congress as a Whig and in 1855 he ran to become a senator but lost. He joined the new Republican Party in 1856. Lincoln ran again in 1858 for the Senate against Stephen A. Douglas, and in a vigorous campaign he and Douglas battled in seven debates. Abraham Lincoln was not an abolitionist, but he deemed slavery as an evil and disputed its expansion. Though he lost the election, he had made a name for himself, and in 1860 he was nominated by the Republicans for president. He ran against a split Democratic Party and was elected with a minority of the popular vote. To the Southern states, Lincoln's election was a sign for secession. By Inauguration Day seven states had seceded, and four more seceded once he issued a summons to the militia. It is largely agreed that Lincoln handled the enormous problems of the Civil War with skillfulness and strength. Besides directing the war, he confronted opposition in the North from radical abolitionists, who believed him too moderate, and from conservatives, who were pessimistic over the possibilities of success in the war. His cabinet was divided by internal animosity, and the progress of the war went against the North initially. In 1863 he proceeded to free the slaves by issuing the Emancipation Proclamation, but sustaining the Union remained his foremost war goal. In 1864 Lincoln ran for reelection against George B. McClellan and won, partially because of the satisfactory turn of military affairs after his appointment of General U.S. Grant as commander-in-chief. Lincoln witnessed the end of the war but did not live to realize his plan for Reconstruction. On April 14, 1865, while attending a play at Ford's Theater, in Washington, D.C., he was shot by the famous actor John Wilkes Booth. Abraham Lincoln died the next morning. His wife was Mary Todd Lincoln (1818-1882). Only one of their four sons, Robert Todd Lincoln, reached adulthood.





Memorable Quotations from Adam Smith

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Adam Smith
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

Adam Smith (1723-90) was a Scottish economist and founder of the classical school of economics. As professor of moral philosophy at the University of Glasgow, he wrote his Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759), which drew international interest. In the 1760s he journeyed in France, met some of the physiocrats, and started to write his masterpiece, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, published in 1776. Smith advanced the theory of the division of labor and stressed that value arises from the labor used in production. He thought that in a laissez faire economy the bent of self-interest would bring about the public welfare. Although opposed to monopoly and the ideas of mercantilism, he acknowledged that restrictions on free trade were occasionally necessary. Although some of Smith's theories were rejected by the experience of the Industrial Revolution, his impact on later economists has never been bested.





Memorable Quotations from Albert Camus

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Albert Camus
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Born in Algeria, Albert Camus (1913–60) was a French writer and philosopher. His belief in the absurdity of the human condition categorized him with existentialism, but his courageous humanism differentiated him from that group. The characters in his novels and plays, although extremely aware of the meaninglessness of the human situation, assert their humanity by rebelling against their circumstances. His best-known works are the novels The Stranger (1942), The Plague (1947), and The Fall (1956) and the essays The Myth of Sisyphus (1942) and The Rebel (1951). Camus was awarded the 1957 Nobel Prize for literature. The first draft of an autobiographical novel, discovered after his death, was published as The First Man (1994).





Memorable Quotations from Aldous Huxley

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Aldous Huxley
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

The English author Aldous Huxley (1894–1963) was the grandson of T.H. Huxley. After writing critical essays and symbolist poetry, he focused on the novel. Crome Yellow (1921), Antic Hay (1923), and Point Counter Point (1928) all portray social decadence. Brave New World (1932) depicts a nightmarish 25th-century Utopia. Additional works include Eyeless in Gaza (1936) and Ape and Essence (1948). In later years he was intensely interested in mysticism and Eastern philosophy. Huxley also published numerous short stories and essays.





Memorable Quotations from Alexander Hamilton

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Alexander Hamilton
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

Born in the West Indies, Alexander Hamilton was an American statesman. In the American Revolution, he was General George Washington’s secretary and aide-de-camp and served splendidly in the Yorktown campaign. As a delegate (1782-83) to the Continental Congress, he urged for a strong national government. While serving as a New York delegate to the Federal Constitutional Convention (1787), he helped to get the Constitution ratified, mainly by his writing inputs to The Federalist. As secretary of the treasury (1789-95) under President Washington, he sponsored legislation to pay off the debt of the Continental Congress and to charter the Bank of the United States. To raise income he encouraged a tariff on imported manufactures and excise taxes. He hoped to strengthen the federal government and tie it to persons of affluence. Hamilton pursued close connections with Britain and opposed the French Revolution. He was killed in a duel by Aaron Burr.





Memorable Quotations from American Abolitionists

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from American Abolitionists
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

American abolitionists, particularly from 1830 to 1860, supported the compulsory emancipation of African-American slaves. The active campaign had its stimulus in the resurgence (1820s) in the North of evangelical religion, with its moral resolve to end sinful practices. The American Anti-Slavery Society, established in 1833, inundated the slave states with abolitionist literature and lobbied in Washington, D.C. Uncle Tom's Cabin, by Harriet B. Stowe, became a successful piece of abolitionist propaganda, and the Kansas question aroused both North and South. The culminating act of abolitionism was John Brown's raid on Harpers Ferry. Abolitionist demands for immediate freeing of the slaves after the eruption of the Civil War resulted in President Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation. The abolitionist movement was one of high moral resolve and courage; its adamant temper hastened the termination of slavery in the United States.

The American abolitionists included in this book are John Brown, William Wells Brown, Maria Weston Chapman, Lydia Child, Frederick Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, Angelina Grimke, Harriet Jacobs, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Sojourner Truth, and Harriet Tubman.





Memorable Quotations from American Generals

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from American Generals
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

The American Generals included in this book are Omar Bradley, George Armstrong Custer, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Nathan Bedford Forrest, James A. Garfield, Ulysses S. Grant, Nathanael Greene, Benjamin Harrison, William Henry Harrison, Rutherford B. Hayes, Andrew Jackson, Thomas Jonathan “Stonewall” Jackson, Robert E. Lee, James Longstreet, Douglas MacArthur, George C. Marshall, George S. Patton, John Joseph Pershing, Franklin Pierce, Colin Powell, Norman Schwarzkopf, William Tecumseh Sherman, Zachary Taylor, George Washington, and Frederick C. Weyand





Memorable Quotations from Andrew Jackson

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Andrew Jackson
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) was the 7th president of the United States from 1829 to 1837. Jackson helped to draft the Tennessee constitution and in 1796 was elected to the Congress. In the War of 1812 he routed the Creek at Horseshoe Bend in March 1814, was made a major general, and resolutely defeated experienced British troops at New Orleans on January 8, 1815. In 1818 he directed retaliation against the Seminoles in Florida and seized Pensacola, involving America in severe trouble with Spain and Britain. The demeanor of Old Hickory, as he was named, delighted the people of the West. He was the highest hero of his time and became associated with enlarged popular participation in government. This so-called Jacksonian democracy almost won him the presidency in 1824, but the election ended in the House of Representatives, with a win for John Quincy Adams. Jackson was elected president in 1828 and brought a strong element of individualism to Washington. His Kitchen Cabinet was influential, and the spoils system ripened. Jackson and Vice President John C. Calhoun clashed on nullification, and Calhoun resigned in 1832. Jackson's battle against the Bank of the United States was an essential issue in the election of 1832, in which he defeated Henry Clay. He then shifted federal assets from the bank to selected state, or "pet," banks. In 1836 he issued the Specie Circular, which said that all public lands must be paid for in specie and which hurried the Panic of 1837.





Memorable Quotations from Benjamin Disraeli

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Benjamin Disraeli
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

Benjamin Disraeli (1804–81), 1st earl of Beaconsfield was a British statesman and writer. Of Jewish ancestry, he was baptized a Christian in 1817. His political essays and novels secured him an enduring place in English literature. Elected to Parliament in 1837, he grew into an exceptional, practical, and scathingly witty politician. In 1848 he became leader of the Tory protectionists. Disraeli supported a political partnership with the working classes, and as chancellor of the exchequer (1852, 1858–59, 1866–68), he “educated his party” (now the Conservative party) to pass the somewhat radical Reform Bill of 1867, which enfranchised about 2 million men, largely of the working class, and significantly helped his party. He became prime minister in 1868 but lost the office to Gladstone that same year. His second ministry (1874–80) generated many domestic reforms but is notable for its forceful foreign policy. The annexation of the Fiji islands (1874) and the Transvaal (1877), and the wars against the Afghans (1878–79) and the Zulus (1879), declared England an imperial world power. Disraeli's purchase of controlling shares of the Suez Canal strengthened British interests in the Mediterranean. After the Russo-Turkish War, he persuaded Turkey to cede Cyprus to Great Britain, and through the Congress of Berlin he lessened Russian power in the Balkans. A favorite of Queen Victoria, he had her crowned empress of India in 1876. His policy of democracy and imperialism energized his party.





Memorable Quotations from Benjamin Franklin

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Benjamin Franklin
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

Born in Boston, Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790) was an American statesman, printer, scientist, and writer. In 1723, he went to Philadelphia as a printer and gained notice for his wittiness and commonsense philosophy, particularly as conveyed in Poor Richard's Almanack. He helped form an academy in 1751 that became the University of Pennsylvania, and he served as deputy postmaster general of the colonies from 1753 to 1774. His renowned experiment with a kite in a thunderstorm verified the presence of electricity in lightning. Franklin suggested a plan of union for the colonies at the Albany Congress in 1754 and was agent for numerous colonies in England. Returning to America in 1775, he helped prepare the Declaration of Independence, which he signed. During the American Revolution he was an effective American agent in France and was appointed, in 1781, a commissioner to negotiate the peace with Britain. Franklin's final notable public service was his presence at the Federal Constitutional Convention in 1787. His autobiography is legendary.





Memorable Quotations from Booker T. Washington

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Booker T. Washington
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) was an American educator, who implored blacks to endeavor to elevate themselves through educational achievements and economic improvement. The son of a slave, Washington was born on a plantation in Franklin County, Virginia. After the American Civil War, his family moved to Malden, West Virginia, where he labored in a salt furnace and in coal mines, going to school whenever he could. He attended a newly-founded school for blacks, Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute (now Hampton University) from 1872 to 1875. After graduation he taught school in Malden and then studied at Wayland Seminary in Washington, D.C. Afterwards, he became a teacher at Hampton Institute, where he helped to establish a night school and was in charge of the industrial instruction of 75 Native Americans. The school was so effective that in 1881 the founder of Hampton Institute, General Samuel Chapman Armstrong, selected Washington as coordinator and principal of a black normal school in Tuskegee, Alabama (now Tuskegee University). Booker T. Washington made the institute into a key facility for industrial and agricultural training and in the process became a celebrated public speaker. On September 18, 1895, in Atlanta, Georgia, Washington made his famous compromise speech. In this address he urged blacks to acknowledge their inferior social position for the present and to endeavor to better themselves through vocational training and economic self-sufficiency. Numerous whites, gratified by his assessments, and many blacks, impressed by his esteem, acknowledged Washington as the leading spokesperson of the American blacks. Washington founded several organizations, including the National Negro Business League, to further black advancement. Among his books are The Future of the American Negro (1899), the autobiography Up from Slavery (1901), Life of Frederick Douglass (1907), The Story of the Negro (1909), and My Larger Education (1911). The site of the plantation where Washington was born is now a national monument.





Memorable Quotations from British Philosophers

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from British Philosophers
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

The brilliant British philosophers included in this remarkable collection of quotations include Sir Alfred J. Ayer, Francis Bacon, Roger Bacon, Jeremy Bentham, F. H. Bradley, Edmund Burke, R. G. Collingwood, Ralph J. Cudworth, Thomas Hobbes, David Hume, John Locke, John Stuart Mill, Thomas Reid, Bertrand Russell, Herbert Spencer, Alfred North Whitehead, and William of Occam.





Memorable Quotations from Business Leaders

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Business Leaders
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

This collection of remarkable quotations is a gem of discerning wisdom, great thoughts, and astute wit gleaned from the words of famous business leaders, including Roger Ailes, Mary Kay Ash, Steve Ballmer, P. T. Barnum, Bruce Barton, Jeff Bezos, Michael Bloomberg, John C. Bogle, Richard Branson, Warren Buffett, Leo Burnett, Andrew Carnegie, Steve Case, Michael Dell, W. Edwards Deming, Barry Diller, Walt Disney, Patrick Dixon, Bernie Ecclestone, Larry Ellison, Malcolm Forbes, Henry Ford, Bill Gates, Jay Gould, Alan Greenspan, Kenneth C. Griffin, Andy Grove, Lee Iacocca, Steve Jobs, Philip Knight, Ken Lay, John Mackey, Michael Milken, Rupert Murdoch, Ross Perot, T. Boone Pickens, Sumner Redstone, John D. Rockefeller, Colonel Sanders, Howard Schultz, Charles Schwab, George Soros, Kerry Stokes, John Templeton, Donald Trump, Ted Turner, Paul A. Volcker, Sam Walton, Thomas J. Watson, Jack Welch, Meg Whitman, Oprah Winfrey, Gordon Wu, and Mortimer Zuckerman.





Memorable Quotations from Calvin Coolidge

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Calvin Coolidge
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

Calvin Coolidge (1872-1933) was the 30th president of the United States (1923-1929). Born and schooled in Vermont, Coolidge graduated from Amherst College in 1895. He was admitted to the practice of law in 1897 and opened a law office in Northampton. Between 1898 and 1911 he served as city councilman, city solicitor, clerk of courts, representative in the Massachusetts legislature, and mayor. He was a senator in the state legislature from 1912 to 1915 and lieutenant governor from 1916 to 1918. With his loyalty to the Republican Party, conservative values, and hard work in his elected positions, Coolidge drew the attention of Massachusetts party leaders. In 1918, Coolidge was nominated as the Republican candidate for governor of Massachusetts. He won by a slim margin. Governor Coolidge first became nationally known in 1919, when the Boston policemen went on strike. They wanted to raise their wages by forming a union. The police commissioner suspended nineteen leaders of the movement, and the police went out on strike. The mayor (a Democrat) called out the state troopers. Governor Coolidge brought in additional troops and asked for federal soldiers in case of a general strike. The policemen returned to work the next day. Governor Coolidge refused to let the suspended policemen return to their jobs. Numerous people began to think of him for the presidency, and his supporters tried to have him nominated at the Republican National Convention in 1920. Instead, the convention chose Senator Warren G. Harding, an Ohio conservative. When a delegate from Oregon nominated Coolidge for vice president, the delegates shouted approval. Coolidge was inaugurated vice president on March 4, 1921. President Harding died unexpectedly on August 2, 1923, and Coolidge became president. Coolidge had no difficulty in being nominated for president and winning the election in 1924. His conservative policies underwent no change after he assumed the presidency for a four-year term on March 4, 1925. Although under Republican control, Congress did not always agree with him. Western farmers did not benefit from the prosperity under Coolidge, and his continued opposition to their demands for government relief led Republican politicians to form coalitions with the Democrats against the president. He sustained his lifelong opposition to the expansion of government functions and the interference of the federal government in private business. In August 1927, he released a statement to the newspapers: “I do not choose to run for president in 1928.” The Republicans nominated Herbert Hoover for president in 1928. Coolidge wrote his Autobiography in 1929 and published articles promoting individualism and a laissez-faire economic policy, in which government did not interfere in individual or business affairs. In January 1933, two months before Franklin Roosevelt was inaugurated, Coolidge died.





Memorable Quotations from Clarence Darrow

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Clarence Darrow
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

Clarence Darrow was renowned worldwide as an outstanding criminal lawyer. Defender in a hundred or more murder trials, he formed a reputation as a friend of labor and of the downtrodden. His oratory and his philosophy made him well-known to millions, and he was defense counsel in some of the most widely publicized cases of his time. He was involved in cases concerning labor disputes or social issues, advocating the cause of the disadvantaged. Darrow's liberal views were based on the belief that the social and psychological pressures were essentially responsible for a person’s anti-social behavior. He was a champion of agnosticism, personal liberty, the abolition of capital punishment, and the improvement of labor conditions. The lost causes dominated his career, making him, because of his empathy with human beings and his fundamental understanding of their emotions, possibly the greatest murder defense lawyer of his era. His most famous trials were those in which the defendants were accused, or confessedly guilty, of murder. The objective was not always to bring about an acquittal, but to avoid the death penalty, or as he called it, “organized, legalized murder.” Clarence Darrow was a humanitarian and had no belief in God or immortality; to him man was merely a clod, a helpless organism continually condemned for getting out of step with the crowd, not for doing evil. The profound, inspiring and famous quotations included in this book were taken from the original sources, which include Clarence Darrow's books, court cases, speeches, orations and lectures. Attorneys, students, and anyone fascinated by the law will enjoy the inspirational words from the very quotable Clarence Darrow, champion of the underdog.





Memorable Quotations from Daniel Webster

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Daniel Webster
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

Daniel Webster was born on January 18, 1782, in Salisbury, New Hampshire, and graduated from Dartmouth College. He studied law in Salisbury and Boston and was admitted to the bar in 1805. He formed a law practice in Portsmouth, New Hampshire; he became involved in politics and joined the Federalist Party. Webster detested the prevalence of Virginians in the national government and opposed the War of 1812. From 1813 to 1817 he served in the U.S. House of Representatives and persuasively upheld Federalist doctrines. Webster moved to Boston in 1816, and the next year he resumed the practice of law. Between 1817 and 1823 he won numerous prominent constitutional cases before the U.S. Supreme Court, especially the Dartmouth College Case (1819), which recognized the precedent that no legislature has the right to harm the obligations enforced by a contract, and McCulloch v. Maryland (1819), which refused the right of the states to tax an institution established by the federal government. Subsequently Webster was usually viewed as one of the foremost attorneys in the country. Webster's articulateness as a speaker at civic gatherings and in court launched him as a celebrated orator. Two of his prominent orations are the Plymouth Speech (1820), memorializing the bicentennial of the arrival of the Pilgrims and the Bunker Hill Speech (1825), observing the 50th anniversary of the legendary American Revolution battle. Webster was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Boston in 1822 and to the U.S. Senate from Massachusetts in 1827. He had opposed legislation for a protective tariff in 1816 and did so again in 1824. Under the authority of escalating New England industrial interests, though, Webster stopped his free-trade position. He favored the tariff of 1828 and became a defender of northern industrial interests on other issues as well. In 1830 his renown as an orator attained its peak in his reply to the speech of Robert Young Hayne, senator from South Carolina, on the description of the Union and the states' right of nullification. Webster effectively battled the theory of nullification and adeptly justified the nationalist view of the Union. In the disagreement over the renewal of the charter of the United States Bank, Webster promoted renewal and resisted the financial policy of President Andrew Jackson. Several of the doctrines of sound finance established in his speeches at this time were later integrated in the Federal Reserve System. When the Whig Party was created in 1834, Webster became one of its leaders, getting the electoral vote of Massachusetts for President in 1836. He was appointed secretary of state by President William Henry Harrison in 1841, a position he maintained under President John Tyler. In that position he negotiated the Webster-Ashburton Treaty (1842), which resolved the disagreement with England, over the boundary between the U.S. and Canada. Webster resigned from the cabinet in 1843. Webster reentered the Senate in 1845. He opposed the annexation of Texas and the war with Mexico. Even though he was individually opposed to slavery, Webster believed in the safeguarding of the Union. His final years in the Senate were committed to attempts to preserve peace between the North and South by means of conciliation. His last great speech was delivered on March 7, 1850, in support of the Compromise Measures of 1850. The speech provoked outrage in the North because of its concessions to slavery. Daniel Webster was secretary of state in the cabinet of President Millard Fillmore from 1850 to 1852. The legendary orator died at home in Marshfield, Massachusetts, on October 24, 1852.





Memorable Quotations from Denis Diderot

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Denis Diderot
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Denis Diderot (1713–84) was a French encyclopedist and materialist philosopher. He was extremely influential in motivating the rationalist thought of the 18th century. His lifework, the Encyclopédie, for which he recruited the leading French talents of the time, exemplified the spirit of the Enlightenment. Also a novelist, satirist, and playwright, he produced The Father of the Family (1758) the first “bourgeois drama.” He wrote many philosophical works and in his Salons pioneered in modern art criticism. In his later years, he appreciated the patronage of Catherine II of Russia.





Memorable Quotations from Dwight D. Eisenhower

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Dwight D. Eisenhower
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Born in Denison, Texas, Dwight David Eisenhower (1890-1969) was an American general and the 34th president of the United States from 1953 to 1961; his nickname was "Ike." A West Point graduate, he had a rapid rise as a military commander during World War II. He became chief of army operations in Washington, D.C. in 1942. Then he was chosen U.S. commander of the European theater of operations, and in 1943 he became supreme commander of the Allied Expeditionary Force. Eisenhower organized and directed the Allied invasion of Europe in June 1944. In December 1944 he was promoted to General of the Army, five-star general, and upon his return to the U.S. became army chief of staff (1945-48). Eisenhower was president of Columbia University from 1948 to 1950 and in 1950 was appointed supreme commander of the Allied forces in Europe. He organized the defense forces of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and then resigned in1952 from the army to campaign for the Republican presidential nomination. Admiration as a World War II hero earned him an effortless election win over his Democratic challenger, Adlai Stevenson. One of Eisenhower's initial actions as president (July 1953) was to deliver a campaign promise to end the Korean War. Ike and his secretary of state, John Foster Dulles, sustained the Truman administration's policy of containing Communism, but efforts were also made to lessen cold-war tensions. Eisenhower stayed detached from the legislative process and took limited initiatives in domestic affairs. Notwithstanding a heart attack in 1955, he effortlessly won reelection in 1956. His administration then took a more energetic position in the increasing civil-rights movement. In 1957 he directed federal troops to Little Rock, Arkansas, to enforce a court-ordered school desegregation decision, and later Congress enacted federal civil-rights legislation. Additionally in 1957, President Eisenhower announced the Eisenhower Doctrine, which pledged the U.S. to a committed role in the Middle East to guard the region from Communist aggression. Strains with the Soviet Union swelled, though, and a summit meeting in1960 with Nikita Khrushchev ended tersely because of discord over U.S. espionage flights over the USSR. In 1959 the emergence to power of the Communist Fidel Castro in Cuba created other complications, and Eisenhower ended diplomatic relations with Cuba before leaving office in January 1961.





Memorable Quotations from Edmund Burke

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Edmund Burke
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

Edmund Burke was an Irish-born British politician and writer, who was a member of Samuel Johnson's literary circle. His early writings involved aesthetics and philosophy. In 1765 he became private secretary to the Marquess of Rockingham (then prime minister) and entered Parliament. In Thoughts on the Cause of the Present Discontents (1770), he was the first to argue the merit of political parties. As a member of Parliament he called for conciliation with the American colonists and warned against taxing them unreasonably. Attempting to reform the British East India Company in the 1780s, he initiated the impeachment of Warren Hastings, governor general of India, on corruption charges. His most renowned work, Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790), expresses his opposition to the Revolution. Burke's writings significantly influenced 19th-century conservative political theory.





Memorable Quotations from Edward W. Brooke

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Edward W. Brooke
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Edward William Brooke (1919-2015) was an American Republican politician. In 1966 he became the first African-American popularly elected to the United States Senate. He was elected from Massachusetts, defeating former Massachusetts governor Democrat Endicott Peabody in a landslide. He served for two terms, and was defeated by Paul Tsongas in 1978. The memorable quotations in this book were chosen from original sources, including Senator Edward Brooke's memoir, addresses, speeches, interviews, and remarks to organizations. Anyone fascinated by American politics and politicians will enjoy the down-to-earth words of Edward W. Brooke.





Memorable Quotations from Ernest Hemingway

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Ernest Hemingway
(Nook Book at B&N)

Born in Illinois, Ernest Hemingway (1899–1961) was one of the notable American authors of the 20th century. With the publication of his novel The Sun Also Rises (1926), he was established as a principal spokesman of the “lost generation” of American expatriates in post–World War I Paris. Writing in a straightforward, succinct style, Hemingway concentrated on brave people living necessary, daring lives. His other major novels include A Farewell to Arms (1929), a heartbreaking wartime love story, and For Whom the Bell Tolls (1940), based on an episode in the Spanish civil war, in which he was a correspondent. He is also renowned for his spirited short stories, e.g., “The Killers” and “The Snows of Kilimanjaro.” In 1945 he settled in Cuba, where he wrote the novella The Old Man and the Sea (1952; Pulitzer). His other writings include the nonfiction works Death in the Afternoon (1932) and Green Hills of Africa (1935). In 1954 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature. He later moved to Idaho, where, afflicted by illness, he committed suicide.





Memorable Quotations from Famous Existentialists

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Famous Existentialists
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

Existentialism is a philosophy that emphasizes the uniqueness and isolation of the individual experience in a hostile or apathetic universe, deems human existence as unexplainable, and stresses freedom of choice and responsibility for the consequences of one's actions.

The extraordinary existentialists included in this book are Simone de Beauvoir, Albert Camus, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Ralph Ellison, Frantz Fanon, Martin Heidegger, Søren Kierkegaard, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Friedrich Nietzsche, José Ortega y Gasset, Jean-Paul Sartre, Miguel de Unamuno, and Richard Wright.





Memorable Quotations from Famous Witty People

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Famous Witty People
(Kindle Book at Amazon)


The famous witty people included in this book are George Ade, Nelson Algren, Fred Allen, Minna Antrim, Tallulah Bankhead, Bernard Baruch, Brendan Behan, David Ben-Gurion, Robert Benchley, Aneurin Bevan, Ambrose Bierce, Lord Birkett, George Borrow, Bertolt Brecht, Vera Brittain, Heywood Broun, Lenny Bruce, Luis Buñuel, Anthony Burgess, William Burroughs, Samuel Butler, Lord Byron, Herb Caen, Truman Capote, Emily Carr, Angela Carter, Sébastien-Roch Nicolas de Chamfort, Raymond Chandler, Charlie Chaplin, Lord Chesterfield, Sir Winston Churchill, Frank Moore Colby, Cyril Connolly, Quentin Crisp, e. e. cummings, Edward Dahlberg, Salvador Dali, Benjamin Disraeli, Albert Einstein, Ian Fleming, E. M. Forster, Benjamin Franklin, Paul Gallico, W. S. Gilbert, Paul Goodman, Ruth Gordon, William Hazlitt, A. P. Herbert, Alfred Hitchcock, Anthony Hope, Kin Hubbard, W. R. Inge, Robert G. Ingersoll, Washington Irving, Alice James, Jerome K. Jerome, Douglas Jerrold, Gerald W. Johnson, Pamela Hansford Johnson, samuel Johnson, John F. Kennedy, Karl Kraus, Joseph Wood Krutch, Jean de La Bruyère, Jean de La Fontaine, Jean-François de La Harpe, François, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Johann Kaspar Lavater, Stanislaw Lec, Oscar Levant, Abraham Lincoln, Walter Lippmann, Anita Loos, Clare Boothe Luce, Archibald MacLeish, Harold Macmillan, Don Marquis, Groucho Marx, Mary McCarthy, Marshall McLuhan, Lord Melbourne, H. L. Mencken, Wilson Mizner, Marilyn Monroe, Malcolm Muggeridge, Ethel Watts Mumford, Ogden Nash, George Jean Nathan, O. Henry, Flannery O'Connor, Dorothy Parker, Cesare Pavese, Pablo Picasso, Ezra Pound, Anthony Powell, V. S. Pritchett, James Reston, Will Rogers, Helen Rowland, Saki (H. H. Munro), Carl Sandburg, Dorothy L. Sayers, George Bernard Shaw, Dame Edith Sitwell, Cornelia Otis Skinner, Logan Pearsall Smith, Madame de Staël, John Steinbeck, Adlai Stevenson, J. August Strindberg, Jonathan Swift, Booth Tarkington, James Thurber, Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree, Lionel Trilling, Mark Twain, Charles Dudley Warner, Orson Welles, Mae West, Oscar Wilde, and Alexander Woollcott.





Memorable Quotations from Franklin D. Roosevelt

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Franklin D. Roosevelt
(Kindle Book at Amazon)


Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945) was the 32nd president of the United States (1933-1945). Roosevelt held office throughout two of the biggest crises ever faced by the United States: the Great Depression of the 1930s, followed by World War II. His domestic agenda, known as the New Deal, launched far-reaching reforms within the free enterprise system. His leadership of the Democratic Party changed it into a political instrument for American liberalism. Both in peacetime and in war his influence on the office of president was immense. While there had been strong presidents before him, they were the exception. In Roosevelt’s twelve years in office, robust executive leadership became an important part of United States government. He made the office of president the epicenter of diplomatic initiative and the center of domestic reform.





Memorable Quotations from Frederick Douglass

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Frederick Douglass
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

Frederick Douglass (c.1817–1895) was an American abolitionist, born near Easton, Maryland. Escaping from slavery in 1838, he took the name Douglass from Sir Walter Scott's Lady of the Lake. In 1845 he published his Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, and in 1847, after English acquaintances had bought his freedom, he founded the North Star (Rochester, New York), which he edited for 17 years, promoting abolition through political activism. During the Civil War he implored African Americans to join the Union ranks, and during and after Reconstruction he held numerous government posts.





Memorable Quotations from Friedrich August Hayek

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Friedrich August Hayek
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Born in Austria-Hungary, Friedrich August Hayek (1899-1992) was an economist and philosopher best known for his defense of classical liberalism and free-market capitalism against socialist and collectivist thought. He is believed to be one of the most influential economists and political philosophers of the twentieth century, winning the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences in 1974.





Memorable Quotations from Friedrich Nietzsche

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Friedrich Nietzsche
(Kindle Book at Amazon)


Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900) was a German philosopher. An original moralist rather than a methodical philosopher, influenced by Schopenhauer and by his early friendship with Richard Wagner, he zealously rejected the "slave morality" of Christianity for a novel, heroic morality that would affirm life. Heading this new society would be a breed of supermen whose "will to power" would set them off from the "herd" of mediocre humanity. His writings, e.g., Thus Spake Zarathustra (1883-91) and Beyond Good and Evil (1886), were later used as a philosophical validation for Nazi doctrines of racial and national superiority; most scholars, though, deem this as a distortion of Nietzsche's thought.





Memorable Quotations from G.K. Chesterton

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from G.K. Chesterton
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

Gilbert Keith (G.K.) Chesterton (1874–1936) was an English author, conservative, and Catholic apologist. A prolific writer, he produced studies of Browning (1903) and Dickens (1906); novels, including The Napoleon of Notting Hill (1904); detective fiction featuring popular Father Brown; poems; and essays, collected in Tremendous Trifles (1909) and other works. With Hilaire Belloc he championed the economic theory of Distributism.





Memorable Quotations from Georg Christoph Lichtenberg

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Georg Christoph Lichtenberg
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Georg Cristoph Lichtenberg (1742-99) was a German scientist and philosopher. His philosophical reputation rests on his aphorisms, which he accumulated in notebooks during his adult life. Lichtenberg believed that the purpose of philosophy was not to settle disagreements such as that between realism and idealism, but to allow us to get beyond them. He also wrote that his entire philosophy was a correction of linguistic usage. A number of his works are collected in The Lichtenberg Reader.





Memorable Quotations from George Bernard Shaw

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from George Bernard Shaw
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

Born in Ireland, George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) was a celebrated playwright and acerbic literary personality of the early 20th century. He first attained fame as a music critic, but by then had already begun writing essays, political pamphlets, books and plays. Among his most well-known plays are Arms and the Man (1894), Major Barbara (1905), Saint Joan (1923), and Pygmalion (1914). The last was adapted fifty years later into the Broadway musical My Fair Lady. Shaw also won an Oscar in 1938 for his screenplay for a non-musical movie version of Pygmalion. For all these successes, Shaw is still better known for his legendarily large ego and sometimes cantankerous personality: He was a vegetarian and teetotaler, a radical socialist and social reformer, and a renowned caustic wit. He remained active until his death at age 94. Shaw won the 1925 Nobel Prize for Literature and remains the only person to win both an Oscar and a Nobel Prize





Memorable Quotations from George Orwell

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from George Orwell
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

George Orwell, pen name of Eric Arthur Blair (1903–50), was an English writer. Several of his works, like Down and Out in Paris and London (1933), The Road to Wigan Pier (1937), and Homage to Catalonia (1938), are autobiographical and sociopolitical. Animal Farm (1946) is a fable about the failure of communism, and his prophetic novel Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949) portrays a totalitarian world. His literary essays are favorably regarded.





Memorable Quotations from George Washington

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from George Washington
(Kindle Book at Amazon)


George Washington (1732-1799) was the first president of the United States (1789-1797) and one of the most eminent leaders in the country’s history. His part in securing independence for the American colonies and afterwards in uniting them under the new United States federal government cannot be overvalued. Struggling against immense complications, he established the Continental Army, which won the American Revolution (1775-1783). After an eight-year struggle, his strategy for victory brought decisive defeat to the British at Yorktown, Virginia, and compelled Great Britain to concede independence to its American colonies.





Memorable Quotations from Gerald R. Ford

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Gerald R. Ford
(Kindle Book at Amazon)


Gerald R. Ford was the 38th president of the United States (1974-77). A Republican congressman from Michigan, he served as Republican minority leader in the House of Representatives and was permanent chairman of the Republican National Convention in 1968 and 1972. In 1973 Ford became the first appointed American vice president when he succeeded Spiro T. Agnew. When Nixon resigned on August 9, 1974, during the Watergate scandal, Gerald Ford became president; one month later he issued a pardon to Nixon. President Ford sustained Richard Nixon's foreign policy and promoted anti-inflationary measures and restricted social spending at home. A presidential candidate in 1976, he lost the election to Democrat Jimmy Carter. His loss was credited to an economic recession and high inflation and to his pardon of Nixon. The memorable quotations in this book were chosen from the original sources, including President Ford's memoir, State of the Union Addresses, speeches, interviews, and remarks to Congress and various other organizations. Anyone fascinated by American politics and politicians will enjoy the down-to-earth words of Gerald Ford.





Memorable Quotations from German Philosophers

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from German Philosophers
(Kindle Book at Amazon)


The remarkable German philosophers included in this book are Theodor W. Adorno, Hannah Arendt, Walter Benjamin, Friedrich Engels, Ludwig Feuerbach, Georg Hegel, Martin Heidegger, Immanuel Kant, Georg Christoph Lichtenberg, Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, Friedrich Schlegel, and Arthur Schopenhauer.





Memorable Quotations from Great American Founding Fathers

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Great American Founding Fathers
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

The great American Founding Fathers included in this historic and educational book are John Adams, Samuel Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, Patrick Henry, John Jay, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Thomas Paine, and George Washington.





Memorable Quotations from Grover Cleveland

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Grover Cleveland
(Kindle Book at Amazon)


Grover Cleveland (1837-1908) was the 22nd (1885-89) and 24th (1893-97) president of the United States. He was chosen as the Democratic candidate to compete against James G. Blaine in 1884, and was elected after an acrimonious campaign. As president he followed his diligent, independent course, upsetting the extremists of his party by his restrained use of the spoils system. In the 1888 election, Cleveland campaigned on a lower tariff, but he lost the election to Benjamin Harrison. The panic of 1893 was a disastrous upset to his second administration, and he enraged radical Democrats by securing repeal of the Sherman Silver Purchase Act. In the Pullman strike of 1894, he sent in soldiers and stopped the strike on grounds that the traffic of the U.S. mail was being halted. He took a persuasive stand on the Venezuela Boundary Dispute, and rejected recognition to a Hawaiian government established by Americans. Grover Cleveland's independence showed him as a man of honor.





Memorable Quotations from Harry S. Truman

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Harry S. Truman
(Kindle Book at Amazon)


Harry S. Truman (1884-1972) was the 33rd president of the United States. He was born in Lamar, Missouri and grew up on a farm near Independence, Missouri. Truman served in World War I and saw action on the battlefield. He married Elizabeth (Bess) Wallace in 1919; they had one daughter, Margaret.

Active in local Democratic politics, he was elected United States senator in 1934 and reelected in 1940. Truman attained national distinction as chairman of a committee investigating government spending during World War II. In 1944, he was nominated for vice president and elected with President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Roosevelt's death on April 12, 1945, propelled Truman into the presidency at the critical period of the final days of World War II. After the fighting in Europe ended on May 8, Truman sanctioned the use of the atomic bomb against Japan at Hiroshima on August 6 and Nagasaki on August 9. On August 14, Japan surrendered.

Truman's domestic program, fundamentally an extension of President Franklin Roosevelt's “New Deal,” was obstructed by the revitalization of the Republicans, who gained control of Congress in 1946. Escalating frictions with the USSR caused the so-called “Cold War.” President Truman took progressively stringent positions. The Truman Doctrine of 1947 was targeted at shielding Greece and Turkey from Communist control. The Marshall Plan in 1947 was created to achieve the economic recovery of Western Europe. The North Atlantic Treaty Organization of 1949 was a multinational defense strategy.

Harry Truman won an astonishing victory over Thomas E. Dewey in the 1948 presidential election. Foreign affairs also dictated his second term, principally United States participation in the Korean War. President Truman did not run for reelection in 1952 and instead retired to his home in Independence, Missouri. As President, his controversial deeds were his decision to use the atomic bomb, the "loss" of China to the Communists, and his sacking of General Douglas MacArthur during the Korean War. He was widely respected for his plain talking and for his capability to make tough decisions.





Memorable Quotations from Henry David Thoreau

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Henry David Thoreau
(Kindle Book at Amazon)


Born in 1817, Henry David Thoreau was an American author, poet, abolitionist, naturalist, tax resister, development critic, surveyor, historian, philosopher, and leading transcendentalist. He is best known for his book "Walden," a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay, "Civil Disobedience," an argument for individual resistance to civil government in moral opposition to an unjust state.





Memorable Quotations from Henry Miller

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Henry Miller
(Kindle Book at Amazon)


Born in New York City, Henry Miller (1891–1980) was an American author. He lived in Paris in the 1930s and afterwards settled in Big Sur, California. His provocative novels, mixing candid sexual description, autobiographical incident, and conjecture on philosophy, literature, and society, include Tropic of Cancer (1934) and Tropic of Capricorn (1939), both banned in the United States until 1961, and the trilogy The Rosy Crucifixion (1949–60). He also wrote an excellent travel book, The Colossus of Maroussi (1941); essays; and the autobiography My Life and Times (1972).





Memorable Quotations from Herbert Hoover

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Herbert Hoover
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

Herbert Hoover (1874-1964) was America’s 31st president. He took office in 1929, the year the American economy plunged into the Great Depression. As the Depression intensified, Hoover failed to acknowledge the gravity of the situation or employ the clout of the federal government to directly address it. A prosperous mining engineer before entering politics, the president was generally perceived as unfeeling and unmoved toward the distress of millions of despairing Americans. Hoover was defeated in the 1932 presidential election by Democrat Franklin D. Roosevelt.





Memorable Quotations from Irish Playwrights

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Irish Playwrights
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

This book offers the reader a selection of thought-provoking quotations from great Irish playwrights, including Samuel Beckett, Brendan Behan, Susannah Centlivre, George Farquhar, Oliver St. John Gogarty, Oliver Goldsmith, Lady Gregory, Charles Macklin, George Moore, Arthur Murphy, Sean O'Casey, George Bernard Shaw, Richard Brinsley Sheridan, Sir Richard Steele, J. M. Synge, Oscar Wilde, and W. B. Yeats.





Memorable Quotations from James Madison

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from James Madison
(Kindle Book at Amazon)


Born in Port Conway, Virginia, James Madison (1751-1836) was the 4th president of the United States from 1809 to 1817. An early challenger of British colonial actions, he helped draft the Constitution for the new state of Virginia, served in the Continental Congress, and was a member of the Virginia legislature. His contributions at the Federal Constitutional Convention in 1787 gained him the title "master builder of the Constitution." A major contributor to the Federalist Papers, he was principally responsible for securing ratification of the Constitution in Virginia. As a congressman from Virginia (1789-1797), he was an ardent advocate of the Bill of Rights. A resolute enemy of the financial measures of Alexander Hamilton, he was a prominent Jeffersonian and drew up the Virginia resolutions protesting the Alien and Sedition Acts. After Jefferson prevailed in the presidential election of 1800, Madison became his secretary of state. He followed Jefferson as president in 1809. The detested and failed War of 1812, known disapprovingly as "Mr. Madison's War," was the principal occurrence of his administration. His term in office beheld the beginning of postwar national expansion and the growth of Jacksonian democracy. Retiring in 1817, he lived peacefully at Montpelier with his wife, Dolley Madison (1768-1849). She wed Madison in 1794, a year after her first husband had died. As official White House hostess for Thomas Jefferson, a widower, and for her husband, she was renowned for the brilliance of her entertainments, as well as for her charisma, discretion, and refinement.





Memorable Quotations from James Thurber

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from James Thurber
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

Born in Ohio, James Thurber (1894–1961) was an American humorist. He was a staff member (1927–33) of and major contributor to the New Yorker magazine. A profound psychological perception underlies his reflective, ironical cartoons and stories. Compilations of his works include The Owl in the Attic (1931), The Thurber Carnival (1945), and Thurber Country (1953). He collaborated with E.B. White on the satire Is Sex Necessary? (1929) and with Elliott Nugent on the play The Male Animal (1940).





Memorable Quotations from Jewish Philosophers

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Jewish Philosophers
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

The exceptional Jewish philosophers included in this notable collection of quotations include Theodor W. Adorno, Hannah Arendt, Sir Alfred J. Ayer, Walter Benjamin, Elias Canetti, Herbert Marcuse, Karl Marx, Michel de Montaigne, Benedict Spinoza, and Ludwig Wittgenstein.





Memorable Quotations from John Adams

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from John Adams
(Kindle Book at Amazon)


John Adams (1735-1826) was the 2nd president of the United States (1797-1801). Born in Quincy (at that time Braintree), Massachusetts, he was the father of John Quincy Adams. John Adams graduated from Harvard University in 1755 and became an attorney. As a moderate but vigorous leader of the group who disputed British actions leading to the American Revolution, he afterwards served in both Continental Congresses and argued persuasively for the Declaration of Independence, which he signed. Adams served America, the new nation, as a diplomat, negotiating the Treaty of Paris in 1783 to end the Revolution and serving from 1785 to 1788 as envoy to Great Britain. He became President George Washington's vice president from 1789 to 1797 and in 1797 succeeded him as president. President Adams's administration showed his trustworthy and tenacious veracity. Though allied with Alexander Hamilton and the conservative, property-respecting Federalists, he was not controlled by them in their fight with the Jeffersonians, led by Thomas Jefferson By reconciliation he averted war with France. He did not altogether support the infamous Alien and Sedition Acts. After 1801 he lived in retirement in Quincy. His wife, Abigail Smith Adams (1744-1818), who was born in Weymouth, Massachusetts, was the leading character in the social life of her husband's administration. Animated and intellectual, she was one of the most eminent and significant of American first ladies.





Memorable Quotations from John Quincy Adams

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from John Quincy Adams
(Kindle Book at Amazon)


John Quincy Adams (1767-1848) was the sixth president of the United States (1825-1829). Born in Braintree (now Quincy), Massachusetts, he was the eldest son of John Adams, who became the second president of the United States in 1797, and Abigail Smith Adams. His career of public service was one of the most diverse and notable in American history. He served America as a diplomat, senator, secretary of state, president, and, during the final years of his life, member of the U.S. House of Representatives.





Memorable Quotations from John Fitzgerald Kennedy

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from John Fitzgerald Kennedy
(Kindle Book at Amazon)


John Fitzgerald Kennedy (1917-1963) was the 35th president of the United States from 1961 to 1963. Born in Brookline, Massachusetts, he was the son of Joseph P. Kennedy and brother of Robert Francis Kennedy and Edward Moore Kennedy. After enlisting in the United States navy in World War II, he served with honor as commander of a PT boat in the Pacific. He was a Democratic congressman from Massachusetts from 1947 to 1953 and in 1952 won a seat in the Senate. The following year he married Jacqueline Lee Bouvier. Kennedy barely lost the Democratic vice presidential nomination in 1956 and in 1960 secured the party's presidential nomination. He beat Republican Richard M. Nixon, becoming at 43 the youngest man to be elected president. His domestic agenda, the New Frontier, called for tax reform, federal aid to education, medical care for the elderly under Social Security, and the expansion of civil rights. Several of his reforms, though, mired in Congress, and foreign-affairs emergencies occupied much of his time. He was widely derided for his support for the failed Bay of Pigs Invasion (1961) of Cuba. In October 1962 American reconnaissance planes found Soviet missile bases there. In the resulting Cuban Missile Crisis, Kennedy ordered a blockade of Cuba and demanded the removal of the missiles. After a short and strained interval, the USSR complied with his demands. The United States and the Soviet Union signed a limited treaty prohibiting nuclear tests the next year. Kennedy additionally increased the amount of American military advisers in South Vietnam to around 16,000. He launched the Alliance for Progress to give economic aid to Latin America and established the Peace Corps. He also pushed hard to accomplish racial integration in the South. On November 22, 1963, Kennedy was shot and killed in Dallas, Texas. Vice President Lyndon Johnson succeeded him as president. The Warren Commission, selected to examine the assassination, determined that it was the work of a lone gunman, Lee Harvey Oswald. In 1979, the House Select Committee on Assassinations, depending in part on acoustical evidence, resolved that a conspiracy was "likely" and that it might have involved organized crime.





Memorable Quotations from John Kenneth Galbraith

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from John Kenneth Galbraith
(Kindle Book at Amazon)


John Kenneth Galbraith (October 15, 1908 - April 29, 2006) was a Canadian-American economist. He was a Keynesian and an institutionalist, a leading proponent of 20th-century political liberalism. His books on economic topics were bestsellers from the 1950's through the 2000's and he filled the role of public intellectual from the 1950's to the 1970's on matters of economics.





Memorable Quotations from Joseph Conrad

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Joseph Conrad
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

Born in Poland, Joseph Conrad (1857–1924) was an English novelist. After a stretch at sea (during which he became a British subject), he began (1894) writing novels in English, an acquired language, and ultimately became one of the greatest prose stylists in English literature. Noteworthy early works include The Nigger of the Narcissus (1897), Lord Jim (1900), and the novellas Youth (1902), Heart of Darkness (1902), and Typhoon (1903). A genius at creating character and atmosphere, Conrad powerfully portrayed individuals suffering from isolation and moral disintegration, and the clash between colonized cultures and European colonizers. His finest works include Nostromo (1904), The Secret Agent (1907), Under Western Eyes (1911), Chance (1913), and Victory (1915).





Memorable Quotations from Lesser-Known American Presidents

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Lesser-Known American Presidents
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

The lesser-known American presidents in this historical and informative book are Chester A. Arthur, James Buchanan, Grover Cleveland, Calvin Coolidge, Millard Fillmore, James A. Garfield, Warren Gamaliel Harding, Benjamin Harrison, William Henry Harrison, Rutherford Birchard Hayes, Andrew Johnson, William McKinley, Jr., James Monroe, Franklin Pierce, James Knox Polk, William Howard Taft, Zachary Taylor, John Tyler, and Martin Van Buren.





Memorable Quotations from Lord Acton

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Lord Acton
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

Lord Acton (John Emerich Edward Dalberg, 1st Baron Acton) (1834-1902) was a British historian and liberal philosopher. Of an English Roman Catholic family, Acton was born in Naples and educated in England and Germany, where he was taught German historical methods by his teacher, a liberal Roman Catholic scholar. In 1859 Acton became editor of the English Roman Catholic periodical The Rambler, but resigned in 1864, when the periodical's liberal views were condemned by church authorities. He also came into conflict with church policy when he opposed defining the doctrine of papal infallibility at the time of the First Vatican Council in 1870. In 1895, after many years of historical study, Acton was appointed Regius Professor of Modern History at the University of Cambridge. His scholarly legacy consists principally of his university lectures, several of which were published after his death. Through his writings and lectures, Lord Acton substantially shaped modern ideas about liberty. Defending the authority of the individual, he believed that concentration of power was detrimental both in church and state.





Memorable Quotations from Lyndon Baines Johnson

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Lyndon Baines Johnson
(Kindle Book at Amazon)


Born near Stonewall, Texas, Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908-1973) was the 36th president of the United States from 1963 to1969. As a Democratic congressman from Texas (1937-1949) he espoused President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal. He was elected senator in 1948 and became majority leader after the 1954 elections. After losing the 1960 presidential nomination to John F. Kennedy, Johnson consented to become Kennedy's running mate. After Kennedy's assassination on November 22, 1963, Johnson was at once sworn in as president. Declaring that he would carry out the deceased president's programs, he adeptly pushed Congress into enacting an $11 billion tax cut and a comprehensive Civil Rights Act in 1964. Elected in 1964 to a full term, he initiated a program of social and economic welfare programs to establish what he designated the Great Society. It included Medicare and Medicaid, federal aid to education, enlarged antipoverty programs, including Head Start, and the 1965 Voting Rights Act. The Department of Transportation and the Department of Housing and Urban Development were created. Johnson's domestic successes, though, were soon eclipsed by foreign affairs. When North Vietnam purportedly attacked American destroyers in August 1964, Congress passed the Tonkin Gulf resolution, which gave the president authority to take any action required to protect American troops. Johnson began in February 1965 the bombing of North Vietnam and enlarged United States forces in South Vietnam to nearly 550,000 by 1969. The Vietnam War provoked extensive opposition in Congress and among the public, and rioting in 1968 in the African-American ghettos of American cities further tarnished his presidency. He broadcast in March 1968 that he would not run for reelection and retired to his Texas ranch. In 1934 he had married Claudia Alta Taylor, nicknamed Lady Bird. They had two children, Lynda Bird and Luci Baines.





Memorable Quotations from Mohandas K. Gandhi

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Mohandas K. Gandhi
(Kindle Book at Amazon)


Mohandas K. Gandhi (1869-1948), a political and spiritual leader, was known as the Mahatma (great-souled) and viewed as the father of independent India. He was educated in law at University College in London. In 1891, after having been admitted to the British bar, Gandhi returned to India and attempted to establish a law practice in Bombay, attaining negligible success. An Indian firm with interests in South Africa retained him as legal adviser two years later. Throughout the country, Gandhi found himself treated as a member of an inferior race. He was shocked at the pervasive denial of civil liberties and political rights to Indian immigrants. As a result, he threw himself into the struggle for basic rights of Indians.

After practicing law in South Africa, Gandhi returned to India in 1915. He gave up Western ways to lead a life of abstinence and spirituality. Gandhi stressed the importance of unity for all people under one God and preached Christian and Muslim ethics along with those of Hinduism. He became an advocate of passive resistance as a way to end British rule. His efforts led the British to imprison him several times, but so great was Gandhi’s following that his threats to fast until death usually forced his release.

He became a major figure in the postwar negotiations that resulted in Indian independence in 1947. When violence broke out between Hindus and Muslims, he resorted to fasts and visits to the troubled areas in efforts to end the violence. He was on one such prayer vigil in New Delhi when he was fatally shot by a Hindu extremist who objected to Gandhi's tolerance for the Muslims. Religious violence soon waned in India and Pakistan after his death, and the teachings of Gandhi inspired nonviolent movements elsewhere, notably in America under the civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr.





Memorable Quotations from Napoleon Bonaparte

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Napoleon Bonaparte
(Kindle Book at Amazon)


Born in Corsica, Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821) was emperor of the French. After the beginning of the French Revolution, he took part in the Corsican rebellion and was forced to leave the island. Returning to France, Bonaparte was linked with the Jacobins and achieved notice by extricating the British from Toulon in 1793. He was temporarily imprisoned in 1794, but his career was revived when the Convention was assaulted in October 1795 by a Parisian mob, and Napoleon was called on to disband it. Bonaparte led the splendid Italian campaign from 1796 to1797 against Austria and completed it with a constructive treaty. Bonaparte then drew up a design to strike at Britain's colonial empire by assaulting Egypt. His triumph in the battle of the Pyramids in July 1798 was made useless when the French fleet was demolished in early August by British Admiral Nelson. Leaving a miserable situation in Egypt, Bonaparte returned to France and joined a conspiracy already formulated. The French Directory was toppled by a coup on November 9-10, 1799, and the Consulate was set up with Bonaparte as first consul. He centralized the administration, stabilized the currency, and reformed the tax system. In 1800 Napoleon crushed the Austrians in Italy and made peace with Austria and Britain. In 1803 Britain again declared war on France. Napoleon had himself crowned emperor in 1804 and proclaimed king of Italy in 1805. The Third Coalition was formed in1805 against him by Britain, Austria, Russia, and Sweden, but Napoleon defeated the Austrians and won his most dazzling victory at Austerlitz, over the Austrians and Russians. Prussia, which joined the coalition in 1806, was defeated. British sea power grew greater with Nelson's victory at Trafalgar. Napoleon then established the Continental System to try to stop British trade with France and her allies. On land, war with Russia endured and Napoleon was victorious. The treaties with Russia and Prussia left Napoleon master of the Continent. The Holy Roman Empire was disbanded in 1806, and the kingdoms of Holland and Westphalia were formed, with Napoleon's brothers as kings. A third brother became king of Naples and king of Spain. In 1809 Austria's effort to revive warfare was crushed and Napoleon annexed the Papal States to France in spite of the protests of Pope Pius VII. In 1809 Napoleon had his marriage to the Empress Josephine, whom he had married in 1796, annulled. He then married Marie Louise of Austria, who bore him a son. Britain stayed an opponent, and the Continental System showed challenging to enforce. Napoleon's first failing had emerged in the Peninsular War, and his alliance with Russia was fragile. When Czar Alexander I rejected the Continental System, Napoleon invaded Russia with the 500,000-strong Grande Armée. After the inconclusive battle of Borodino, Napoleon entered Moscow, but the winter and scarcity of supplies forced him to begin a calamitous retreat that became a rout in late November. Napoleon left his army and rushed to Paris to organize French defenses. Prussia swiftly turned against France and was joined in a coalition by Britain, Sweden, and Austria. The allies defeated the emperor at Leipzig in October 1813, chased him into France, and took Paris. Napoleon abdicated on April 11, 1814, and was exiled to the island of Elba, which the allies furnished him as a sovereign principality. His victors were still deliberating at the Congress of Vienna when Napoleon arrived at Cannes and marched on Paris. King Louis XVIII escaped, and Napoleon ruled during the Hundred Days. He was defeated, though, in the Waterloo campaign in 1815 and abdicated again. Sent as a prisoner of war to the isolated British island of Saint Helena, he died there on May 5, 1821. His remains were returned to Paris in 1840.





Memorable Quotations from Oscar Wilde

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Oscar Wilde
(Kindle Book at Amazon)

Oscar Wilde (1854–1900) was an Irish writer who exalted beauty for itself alone. His genius was best conveyed in his splendidly witty plays, especially The Importance of Being Earnest (1895). In his only novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891), a young man is corrupted by sensual excess and moral apathy. Wilde's poems The Ballad of Reading Gaol (1898) and De Profundis (1905) were motivated by the prison term (1895–97) he served because of his homosexuality. He additionally wrote short stories, fairy tales, and essays.





Memorable Quotations from Ralph Waldo Emerson

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Ralph Waldo Emerson
(Nook Book at B&N)

Born in Boston, Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–82) was one of America's most prominent authors and thinkers. A Unitarian minister, he left his only pastorate, Boston's Old North Church (1829–32), because of doctrinal disagreements. On a trip to Europe Emerson met Thomas Carlyle, S.T. Coleridge, and Wordsworth, whose ideas, along with those of Plato, the Neoplatonists, Asian mystics, and Swedenborg, intensely influenced his philosophy. Returning home (1835), he settled in Concord, Mass., which he, Margaret Fuller, Thoreau, and others made a base of transcendentalism. He stated the movement's main principles in Nature (1836), stressing the mystical unity of nature. A distinguished lecturer, Emerson called for American intellectual independence from Europe in his Phi Beta Kappa address at Harvard (“The American Scholar,” 1837). In an address at the Harvard divinity school (1838), he stressed that redemption could be found only in one's own soul and intuition. Emerson developed transcendentalist themes in his well-known Journal (kept since his student days at Harvard), in the magazine The Dial, and in his series of Essays (1841, 1844). Among the best known of his essays are “The Over-Soul,” “Compensation,” and “Self-Reliance.” He is also notable for his poems, among others, “Threnody,” “Brahma,” and “The Problem.” His later works include Representative Men (1850), English Traits (1856), and The Conduct of Life (1870).





Memorable Quotations from Richard Milhous Nixon

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Richard Milhous Nixon
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Born in Yorba Linda, California, Richard Milhous Nixon (1913-1994) was the 37th president of the United States from 1969 to 1974. As a Republican U.S. representative from California (1947-1951) he achieved national distinction for his investigation of Alger Hiss. In the Senate (1951-1953), he criticized the Democratic administration as being complimentary to Socialism. Nixon was elected to the vice presidency on the Republican ticket with Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1952; they were reelected in 1956. As a well-informed vice president, Nixon played an essential role in government affairs. He ran for president in 1960 but was beaten by John F. Kennedy, and in 1962 he was defeated in the race for governor of California. In 1968 he again secured the Republican presidential nomination and, with his running mate, Spiro T. Agnew, defeated Hubert H. Humphrey and George C. Wallace. As president, Nixon attained a cease-fire in the Vietnam War, but only after he had directed invasions of Cambodia in 1970 and Laos in 1971 and the bombing of North Vietnam. In further areas of foreign affairs, he opened strategic arms limitation talks with the Soviet Union in 1969 and visited the People's Republic of China in 1972. Domestically, he undid many of the social and economic welfare programs of President Lyndon Johnson's administration and, hoping to entice the South into the Republican Party, undermined the federal government's pledge to racial equality. His administration was beset by economic woes that led to the burden in 1971 of wage and price controls. Notwithstanding these setbacks, he and Agnew were effortlessly reelected in 1972, attaining a landslide win over George S. McGovern. Agnew was driven to resign in 1973 and was replaced by Gerald R. Ford. Probes into the Watergate affair and findings by the Internal Revenue Service revealed extensive corruption in Nixon's administration, and in 1974 the House of Representatives began impeachment proceedings. After finishing its investigations, the House Judiciary Committee recommended three articles of impeachment: obstruction of justice, abuse of power, and failure to comply with congressional subpoenas. On August 5, 1974, Nixon acknowledged that he had instructed the FBI to halt investigating the Watergate burglary. On August 9, 1974, he became the first president to resign. His successor, Gerald R. Ford, granted him a full pardon, quelling the likelihood of criminal proceedings. In retirement Nixon continued to speak publically, often persuasively, on foreign affairs and penned his memoirs in 1978 and wrote numerous other books.





Memorable Quotations from Ronald Reagan

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Ronald Reagan
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Born in Tampico, Illinois, Ronald Wilson Reagan (1911-2004) was the 40th president of the United States from 1981 to 1989. A movie actor who was president of the Screen Actors Guild, he was a champion of the New Deal many years before he joined the Republican Party in 1962 and began to advocate right-wing causes. As governor of California for two terms, 1967-1975, he slashed state welfare and medical services and education funds. After leaving office, he campaigned for the 1976 Republican presidential nomination but lost narrowly to President Gerald Ford. Four years later he won the nomination and, with his running mate, George Bush, roundly defeated President Jimmy Carter. Reagan’s presidency had scarcely begun when he was shot by a would-be assassin, John Hinckley, Jr., on March 30, 1981; he recuperated swiftly. Promoting a balanced budget to fight inflation, he upturned long-standing political trends by winning Congressional passage of huge income-tax cuts, reduced social-program spending, and increased defense spending. He was reelected in 1984, defeating Democratic candidate Walter Mondale. Reagan adopted a strong stance in relations with the USSR and against likely Communist expansion, particularly in Central America. Nevertheless, he made significant steps in U.S./Soviet nuclear disarmament negotiations, signing the INF treaty with the USSR. His tax and spending policies, though, led to massive peacetime budget deficits, greatly increasing the national debt. In 1994 he revealed that he had Alzheimer's disease in hope of expanding public awareness of the disease.





Memorable Quotations from Sports Figures

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Sports Figures
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This collection of remarkable quotations is a gem of discerning wisdom, great thoughts, and astute wit gleaned from the words of famous sports figures, including Hank Aaron, Muhammad Ali, Sparky Anderson, Arthur Ashe, Charles Barkley, Yogi Berra, Terry Bradshaw, Harry Caray, Roberto Clemente, Dale Earnhardt, Chris Evert, Wayne Gretzky, Lou Holtz, Sam Huff, Phil Jackson, Michael Jordan, Billie Jean King, Bobby Knight, Tommy Lasorda, Vince Lombardi, John Madden, John McEnroe, Jack Nicklaus, Chuck Noll, Tom Osborne, Satchel Paige, Arnold Palmer, Joe Paterno, Bum Phillips, Pat Riley, Art Rooney, Ayrton Senna, George Steinbrenner, John Wooden, Tiger Woods, and Al Davis.





Memorable Quotations from The Marquis de Sade

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from The Marquis de Sade
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Donatien Alphonse François, comte de Sade (1740–1814) was a French author known as The Marquis de Sade. Charged with several sexual offenses, he spent 27 years in prisons or asylums, writing lewd romances, including Justine (1791). He hypothesized that since sexual deviation and criminal acts exist in nature they are natural; this notion foreshadowed modern psychological thought. Sadism, the infliction of pain to achieve sexual pleasure, is named for him.





Memorable Quotations from Theodore Roosevelt

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Theodore Roosevelt
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Born in New York, Theodore Roosevelt (1858–1919) was the 26th president of the United States (1901–9). The frail son of a prominent family, he made resolute efforts to overcome the fragile health that would significantly affect his character. After graduating (1880) from Harvard, he served (1882–84) as a Republican state legislator. Bereft by the deaths (1884) of his mother and his wife, Alice Hathaway Lee, he retreated to his ranch in the Dakota Territory. Returning to New York in 1886, he wed Edith Kermit Carow and served on the Civil Service Commission, as head (1895–97) of the New York City police board, and as assistant secretary (1897–98) of the navy. In 1898 he established, with Leonard Wood, the Rough Riders regiment that fought in Cuba during the Spanish-American War; he came home a hero. He was elected (1900) vice president under William McKinley, and upon McKinley's assassination in Sept. 1901 became president at the age of 42. An activist and an inventive leader, he set about “trust busting” by instigating some 40 lawsuits against the big trusts. He also fathered significant conservation legislation. His championship of the rights of the “little man” captured the people's imagination, and he was reelected (1904) by a landslide. His second administration ensured passage of the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906. His progressive reforms directed at regulation, not elimination, of big business. Roosevelt conclusively increased the power of the president, principally in foreign affairs. Asserting that the U.S. had the right to enforce order in Latin America, he intervened (1903) in a civil war in Panama to promote construction of the Panama Canal. He mediated (1904) the end of the Russo-Japanese War, for which he won the 1906 Nobel Peace Prize. Though he had hand-picked William Howard Taft to succeed him, he became irritated at Taft's obvious lack of progressive principles and split the Republican party in 1912 by running for president as the third-party Progressive, or Bull Moose, candidate. He outpolled Taft but lost the election. Throughout his busy career he found time for big game hunting and for writing numerous books.





Memorable Quotations from Thomas Edison and Henry Ford

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Thomas Edison and Henry Ford
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“Yes, there is a big future for any light-weight engine that can develop a high horsepower and be self-contained. Keep on with your engine. If you can get what you are after, I can see a great future.” These initial words of reassurance came from Thomas Edison, who was to become one of Henry Ford's cherished friends. At their first encounter at a convention in 1896, Ford was still an unknown. But the enthusiasm of the celebrated and broadly respected Edison assuredly powered Ford's ambition. The friendship between Henry Ford and Thomas Edison, which spanned more than 30 years, is legendary. They encouraged and inspired one another, often helping each other's work. These two extraordinary men had a warm, loyal and devoted friendship that lasted during their astonishing lives.





Memorable Quotations from Thomas Jefferson

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Thomas Jefferson
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Born in Virginia, Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826) was the 3rd president of the United States. A member (1769–75) of the Virginia house of burgesses, he was a leader of the patriot group. At the Second Continental Congress he drafted the Declaration of Independence, a historic document that exhibits his indebtedness to John Locke and other philosophers. In 1779 he became governor of Virginia, steering that state through the difficult last years of the American Revolution. In 1785 he became minister to France. Appointed secretary of state (1790–93) in President George Washington's cabinet, Jefferson defended agrarian interests against the Federalist policies of Alexander Hamilton and led a group called the Republicans, predecessors of the present-day Democratic Party. He served as vice president (1797–1801) and disputed the passage of the Alien and Sedition Acts by writing the Kentucky Resolutions. The Republicans triumphed at the polls in 1800, but Aaron Burr, who had been slated to become vice president, tied Jefferson in the presidential vote. Jefferson was finally chosen president by the House of Representatives, largely on the recommendation of Hamilton, who considered Jefferson less dangerous than Burr. Jefferson was the first president inaugurated in Washington, a city he had helped to plan. He established a republican simplicity in the city and cut federal expenditures. He thought that the federal government should be concerned primarily with foreign affairs, leaving local matters to the states and community authorities. Regularly rigorous in interpreting the Constitution, he pushed through the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, an act that it did not explicitly authorize. He also devised the Lewis and Clark Expedition. During his second administration, problems arose from attacks on neutral U.S. shipping by the warring superpowers of Britain and France. With such measures as the Embargo Act of 1807 he attempted to use economic pressure to achieve a solution, but this stirred strong opposition in the U.S. In retirement after 1809 at his much-loved home, Monticello, Jefferson brought about the creation of the University of Virginia and continued his enduring interests in science, architecture, philosophy, and the arts.





Memorable Quotations from Tycoons of the Gilded Age

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Tycoons of the Gilded Age
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The tycoons of the Gilded Age included in this informative and educational book are Andrew Carnegie, Jay Gould, Andrew W. Mellon, John Pierpont Morgan, John D. Rockefeller, and Cornelius Vanderbilt.





Memorable Quotations from Ulysses S. Grant

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Ulysses S. Grant
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Ulysses Simpson Grant (1822-1885) was commander in chief of the Union army in the American Civil War and the 18th president (1869-1877) of the United States. Born in Point Pleasant, Ohio, he graduated from West Point in 1843. For two years he served in several posts in Missouri and Louisiana and in 1845 he joined the Texas command of General Zachary Taylor. He fought in the Mexican War (1846-1848) and was twice cited for bravery in combat.

When the Civil War began, he was commissioned colonel and then brigadier general of a regiment of volunteers and fought his first battle at Belmont, Missouri, on November 9, 1861. In February 1862 he captured Fort Henry and Fort Donelson in Tennessee, delivering the first major Union victory, and was promoted to major general. The Vicksburg campaign, 1862 to 1863, which finished Confederate control of the Mississippi, was one of his greatest achievements.

Summoned to the supreme command in the West in October 1863, he defeated the Confederate forces under General Braxton Bragg at Chattanooga. President Lincoln promoted him to commander in chief, with the rank of lieutenant general, in March 1864. Grant directed the Union army to victory in the Wilderness campaign in May to June of 1864 and took Robert E. Lee's surrender at Appomattox on April 9, 1865. He was made full general in 1866.

Grant was elected president in 1868 and reelected in 1872. His administration included a progression of scandals. Although Grant was involved in none of them, the irregularities perpetrated by officials in his government and by members of his party in Congress reflected on the president. His unrelenting loyalty to friends whose abuse of public office was well known hurt Grant's reputation. Grant left office in March 1877 and on May 17 he sailed with his family for England on the first step of a trip around the world. In all places he was well received as the hero of the Civil War. After two years Grant returned home.

Grant's final years were harsh ones. When he resigned from the army to become president he had given up a guaranteed income for life. After returning to the United States from Europe, his family survived on the income from a fund collected by friends. When the securities in which the fund was invested crashed, Grant was without financial means.

In 1885 Congress voted to restore Grant's rank of full general with a suitable salary. By that time he was gravely ill and moved to Mount McGregor, New York, in order to repair his health. There he began writing his reminiscences of the war years, the Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant (1885-1886). They were completed a week before he died of cancer. The book was a decisive success. Grant focused on the Civil War, the phase of his greatest glory and attempted to inform what really happened, acknowledging his errors and sharing credit with others. His book is one of the world’s impressive war commentaries of all time. Grant died at Mount McGregor in 1885, and he rests today in the great mausoleum known as Grant's Tomb, overlooking the Hudson River in New York City.





Memorable Quotations from Walter Bagehot

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Walter Bagehot
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Walter Bagehot (1826-1877) was a British economist and journalist who was born in Somersetshire, England, and educated at the University of London. He married a daughter of the British economist James Wilson, founder of the highly regarded Economist, and from 1860 until his death Bagehot was editor of that newspaper. Bagehot was active in important political and financial circles, and his writings, which deal with politics and business in a scientific manner, were based on his own observations. He wrote the following books: the classic The English Constitution (1867), which differentiated effectual government institutions from those in decline and was translated into numerous languages; Physics and Politics (1872), an early relevance of Darwinism to the social sciences; and Lombard Street (1873), a study of the money market. In addition, Bagehot penned essays on history, economics, and literature. He was also a noted literary critic.





Memorable Quotations from William Jennings Bryan

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from William Jennings Bryan
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William Jennings Bryan (1860-1925) was an American political leader and orator. He was a member (1891-95) of the U.S. House of Representatives. At the 1896 Democratic national convention he made his celebrated "Cross of Gold" speech in defense of free silver. He was nominated for president but lost to William McKinley that year and in 1900; in 1908 he lost to W.H. Taft. In 1912 he helped to elect Woodrow Wilson, who appointed him secretary of state (1913-15). An activist of religious fundamentalism, he appeared for the prosecution in the 1925 Scopes trial. Several of the reforms he advocated were later adopted, including the income tax and woman suffrage. The profound, inspiring and famous quotations included in this book were taken from the original sources, which include Bryan’s books, court cases, speeches, orations and lectures.





Memorable Quotations from Winston Churchill

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By Jim Dell


Memorable Quotations from Winston Churchill
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Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill (1874-1965) was a British statesman, soldier, and writer. A graduate of Sandhurst, he fought in India, the Sudan, and South Africa. In 1900 he was elected to Parliament. Churchill was the first lord of the admiralty (1911-1915) in World War I until disgraced by the failure of the Dardanelles campaign, which he had advocated. He afterwards served in numerous cabinet positions in the Liberal government of Lloyd George. A Conservative after 1924, he was Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1924 to 1929; his revaluation of the pound was a component leading to the general strike of 1926. Not in office from 1929 to 1939, Churchill broadcast ignored warnings of the danger of Nazi Germany. In 1940, seven months after the outbreak of World War II, he succeeded Neville Chamberlain as prime minister. His rousing oratory, his vigor, and his refusal to make peace with Hitler were critical to sustaining British resistance from 1940 to 1942. Before the United States entrance’ into the war, he met President Franklin D. Roosevelt at sea for crucial talks. He twice addressed the American Congress, twice went to Moscow, and attended a series of international conferences, including the Yalta Conference. Following the postwar Labour victory in 1945, he became leader of the opposition. In 1951 he was once more elected prime minister; he was knighted in 1953 and retired in 1955. Winston Churchill was the author of many histories, biographies, and memoirs, and in 1953 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature.





Chinese Proverbs

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By Jim Dell


Chinese Proverbs
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The allure of Chinese proverbs is intense and global. With conciseness, lucidity, and economy, these prudently selected words help pass insight and understanding throughout the epochs. This enduring, expressive collection of proverbs offers essential realities about the world and humanity.





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